Tag Archives: Foreign Correspondent

HORRU… Thru a Pinhole!

jesús joglar 1

 

I recently received this photograph in the mail.  Jesús Joglar, who specializes in pinhole photography sent it to me from Barcelona, Spain.  I was involved in a postcard exchange and was delighted when this month’s postcardpal sent me such an interesting print.  I was going to post the photo on my photoblog, but thought it really should be on TedBook for all to see.  Here is the information Jesús furnished describing the photo.

Enclosed please find a contact copy of my pinhole photograph entitled ‘horru’, the name of the raised granary, a typical way of keeping the food (corn grain, pork cured meat, etc.) in Asturias, a region in the North coast of Spain where I come from.

I made it with a Zero Image 45 pinhole camera with a pinhole ø of 0.28 mm, a focal length of 50 mm, what gives an f/176 and <116˚ using 4×5 black&white Fomapan 200 [ISO 200] film with an exposition time of 10 sec.  I developed in homebrewed Ilford ID-11 stock at 20˚  C for 6 min [12 sec 0 / 1 min] and made the contact copy in Ilford Multigrade IV RD De LUXE Pearl.

I hope you like it!  With warm regards… Jesús Joglar

 

Well, I not only like it… I love it and am going to frame it and hang it on my wall with other works of art.  I have no idea what Jesús said in his second paragraph, but I imagine my photographer pals Joan Benney and Jaime Powell Shepard will be all over it.  The only pinhole photographer I know is Fiona Small here in Friday Harbor… a talented artist and actress, and one of my favorite people to photograph at the County Fair.

To see a bit of Spain and learn more about Jesús Joglar’s Pinhole Photography… LIGHT THROUGH A HOLE

 

 

THE CUBAN DIARY… WHERE THE REVOLUCIÓN STARTED!

at fidels''''

The Foreign Correspondent and her Mother

WHERE THE REVOLUCIÓN STARTED!

The Comandancia in the Sierra Maestra, near Bayamo

 I hike on the orange path, climbing over large rocks embedded in the dirt. I am almost wading through the slick mud. The weather is cool, refreshing to hike in. The view from the edge of the path is breathtaking, I could spend the whole hike just looking over the side into the valley below.
jungle
After about an hour of walking we reach a flat space that the guide says is a place for the helicopters to land. We walk past the helipad and get to a small wooden building, our guide opens the doors and we walk inside. It is dark inside, until our guide flings open the windows and grey light begins to fill the small room. As my eyes adjust to the dim light, I see that it is some sort of museum. There are old typewriters and a sewing machine. In the middle of the floor is a 3-D map of the Sierra Maestra. On the map there is a miniature flag, not the  Cuban flag, but the flag of the revolution, red and black, with 26 de Julio (26 of July) on it, marking the spot where the Comandancia is. 
cross
By the wall, is the memorial plaque for a soldier who died before the revolution ended. The memorial is a simple cross made of what looks like driftwood, with his name and the date he died engraved in Spanish on a tin plate that was probably his.  
fidels house
When we leave the museum our guide closes the windows and doors enveloping the room in darkness again. We continue on, and soon the guide stops and points to a place where there is no grass and there are rose bushes and says that it’s the grave of the man whose memorial we saw in the museum. We move on and come to the house of the secretary, it’s empty except for some shelves built-in to the walls. After this we reach steps made of the trunks of small trees stripped of their bark. We traverse these steps carefully as they are wet and slippery. After about ten minutes we reach another building, this one the guide also had to open, inside there is a kitchen and a bedroom, our guide explains that this was Fidel’s house.  We all got our picture taken with it, but we couldn’t go inside. We leave the house and pass a small building which the guide identifies as Fidel’s outhouse, so of course my papa has to get his picture taken with it.
outhouse
We move on and reach a building with the letters ACTL above the door, they stand for Administracion Central de la Tierra Libre (Central Administration of the Free Land), the former headquarters of the Revolution is now an old structure on the verge of collapse, it seemed amazing it had stood this long. After this we leave the Comandancia. It’s another long hike back to the car that brought us to the trail head, interrupted only by a short coffee break on the way down.
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Our Foreign Correspondent, Ula Grace, reports on her visit to Cuba with her parents Krista and Steve.
To see other stories… THE CUBAN DIARY
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For my friends on the Moonshine Grid

THE CUBAN DIARY… LEAVING CUBA

Ua with Che

NOTEBOOK ~ LEAVING CUBA

As I leave Cuba, I think about these past few weeks and how amazing they have been. I think about all the dives we went on, the two wreck dives and seeing the ships loom out of the darkness perched on their underwater precipice. Horseback riding through fields of tobacco, trotting on the red muddy cart track, surrounded by cliffs of a reddish hue. Lounging in the sun on the white beaches of Varadero by the sparkling turquoise water. Walking through the sweltering streets of Havana, marveling at the crumbling façade on colonial buildings. The plane wheels are spinning faster and faster as we speed down the runway, the nose of the plane tips up and I sit with my body pressed against the seat, the seatbelt tight in my lap. We’re in the air flying at incredible speed, to me this is as normal as walking, I was flying soon after I could walk and then I learned to swim. I look down on the ocean and see the green spit of land that is Cuba recede from view and blue gradually became the only color in sight.

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Ula Grace

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TedBook’s Foreign Correspondent, is on her way home, her mind filled with stories to tell.  She sends this dispatch as her plane takes off heading north.  More to come…

Ula’s earlier stories are here…

ULA GRACE… Foreign Correspondent

THE CUBAN DIARY… The Canvas

THE CUBAN DIARY… The Dance

THE CUBAN DIARY… Author Photo

THE CUBAN DIARY… AUTHOR PHOTO

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Foreign Correspondent Ula Grace

Finally news from Cuba!  TedBook’s Foreign Correspondent and Travel Editor, following in the footsteps of another author that spent time in Cuba and liked cats, here Ula is trying out Cuba’s most famous export.  We anxiously await her next post.

Guest Photographer… Krista Strutz

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Ula’s earlier stories are here…

ULA GRACE… Foreign Correspondent

THE CUBAN DIARY… The Canvas

THE CUBAN DIARY… The Dance

THE CUBAN DIARY… THE DANCE

ula on ferry after myanmar

THE DANCE

There’s salsa music playing while I sit on the cobblestone steps watching people dance. If I stare straight ahead I can see over the red-tiled rooftops of Trinidad. I see the ocean, a great expanse of blue condensed into a thin line on the horizon. One of the dancers is a little girl, she’s wearing a bright pink shirt. She’s accompanied by her aunt or older sister. She looks to be about nine years old and already a great dancer. Her dark hair is pulled back into a neat bun and adorned with fake flowers. At the end of the song, they leave the dance floor. I see the cobblestone stairs beginning to fill with people. It’s fun to watch the band play because they all dance to the music with the rest of the dancers. The music they are playing is traditional that has been turned into rock. I convince my mom to dance with me, but neither of us can lead so we dance by ourselves, until a man in a red sweatshirt starts to dance with me. He’s a good dancer and conscious of the fact that I’m not the best. As we dance to the salsa, out of the corner of my eye I see someone join my mother. They are dancing faster than we are. When the song ends, I go back to my chair only to be asked again by a gentleman about 70 years old. We dance by the table my parents are sitting at. He also dances slowly, but as the song goes on we dance faster. When the song ends, he kisses me on the cheek and then we leave.

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Another dispatch from our Foreign Correspondent, Ula Grace, traveling in Cuba with her parents Krista and Steve. A few days prior I had received an email from Krista, here is an excerpt…

And now we are in Santiago. Last night, with the help of a new local friend, we snuck Ula into a fabulous and seedy house of music, and danced! (the locals said I dance like a Puerto Rican – whatever that means!) Fantastic! Heading off on another memorable overnight bus to Trinidad tomorrow, and hopefully a little beach time. We really like Cuba in general; the people are very nice and helpful, the streets are incredibly clean even within all the colonial decay. And people are very surprised and pleased when we tell them where we are from! 

I am curious to know what ‘dancing like a Puerto Rican‘ means to a Cuban… it can’t be good. Anxiously awaiting Ula’s next post… and Krista’s… I’ll keep you posted.

To follow THE CUBAN DIARY
ULA GRACE… Foreign Correspondent
THE CUBAN DIARY… The Canvas

New Staff Member at TedBook

ula on ferry after myanmar

Returning home from Myanmar last year…

Last week the Publisher of TedBook sent out the following letter to a recent guest author:

TedBook letter to ula

Today we received the following reply:

Ula's letter to TedBook

Her first assignment starts January 14th… Stay Tuned…

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Recent Posts by Miss Grace…

THE DOORKNOB

HOME

THE CUBAN DIARY

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moonshine  I thought my friends at yeah write.me would like to meet the new Foreign Correspondent at TedBook.  She leaves next week for a country not many Americans have visited.  We are looking forward to her reports… internet availability willing.  Here’s a few pics of past travels…

Thailand

Thailand

 

India

India

Japan

Japan

Thailand

Thailand

Egypt

Egypt

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