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THE WRITER

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THE WRITER

Last Chance by Max Welton

It is hard going, but the demolition is scheduled for tomorrow.   The brush that started at your ankles now reaches chest height, the fence is in sight.  Past bulldozers, poised like fierce beasts to devour the hapless sanitarium, you enter the north wing and hunt for room #36.  An excited sadness overwhelms you as you search her room for what was hidden within the wall.  After the accident her decline had been swift.  Seventeen years since you learned the truth about Daisy, it’s now or never.   An unseen hand guides you to a loose wallpaper patch,  glittering Art Deco reveals itself. Her bracelets are safe once again.

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FROM THE DESK OF MAX WELTON

So, that’s it!  The start to my first novel.  I’m kind of going for a Twilight Zone vibe here, maybe Rod will be interested when I’m done.  I’ve always wanted to be a writer, like my uncle Nick. I’ve written a few poems and stories for the Reader when I can find the time, but I would really like to write a novel.  I have great ideas and can write really great titles, like ‘Death in the Shadow of Saint Mary’s’.  I live on the North Side in Bucktown, a Polish/Puerto Rican/Low Rent neighborhood, and I work right down the street from St. Mary of the Angels, I think it’s the coolest looking church in Chicago.  I can just never come up with a story… that was it, just a great title.  It’s going to be a murder mystery someday when I can think of a story.  But right now, I’m quitting my job and writing full-time to finish ‘Last Chance’, thanks to uncle Nick.

My uncle Nick was a famous writer, well kind of famous.  He had one big hit, but made a decent living writing for magazines.  He was very kind to my mom and me, more like a father than my father.  When I told him I wanted to be a writer when I grew up, he said “Write what you know about.”  I saw my first Sox and Cubs games with Nick, he introduced me to art, and he showed me Chicago.  I wanted to be just like him.  I still do after all these years.

Nick was killed covering the war when I was just out of high school.  He never married, and I was his only heir, so I was not only sad, but expecting a nice inheritance.  Like the character in his book, I got cheated.  He left everything to the Perkins Sanitarium in New York.  I got a few boxes of old letters and unfinished manuscripts.   I was bitter at first, but his lawyer told me that Perkins had given Nick his life back when he was lost in an alcoholic depression.  He had dreamed of being a writer, not a bond salesman, and a new technique called ‘automatic-writing’ was a perfect fit to help cure him.  His doctor suggested he write about the events in Long Island, and the grief that was fueling his condition.  “Write a book.  Even if you are the only person to ever read it”, he said.  It worked, because Nick came out a well man, and a writer.  The story was published to a huge success.  He moved back to the Midwest to be near his family and write stories.  He took care of me, so I forgave him.

Years later, I actually looked at the contents and discovered a story he never intended to publish.  I thought it was interesting, as it was about a distant cousin named Daisy.  She had been part of the whole Long Island thing, and ended up in a ritzy mental hospital also, Lakeview Sanitarium on the North Shore.  That’s where the filthy rich went… guys like me went to Cook County.

That was awhile back.  I forgot all about it until the other day.  I was reading the business section of the Trib, and saw that some new luxury homes were slated to be built there, using the bricks from the Lakeview Sanitarium.  The property had been abandoned to seagulls and rats for many years and was in ruins.  Demolition was slated soon.  That jogged my memory… something Nick had mentioned in his story about Daisy.

I found the volume devoted to Daisy.  Nick tells how her life unraveled after the murder of Gatsby.  She was a woman torn between two men not able to have them on her terms, her tense gaiety gone, and perhaps never forgave herself for her involvement in an automobile accident.  She had been the one driving the Rolls, and Jay had covered for her.  Nick was never sure if her husband knew she was the driver, but Tom Buchanan saw fit to take her away from the unhappy scene.  They moved from East Egg back to their estate in Chicago, not even going to the funeral.  When Nick finally went to see Daisy, he found that stricken with grief and guilt, she had slipped into a despondency so great that she was in a constant state of shock.  Her husband could no longer put up with it or bear to watch and committed her to a sanitarium, where she stayed till her death.  Sadly, Nick was her only visitor, and would go to Lakeview to visit Daisy once a month.

This is the part I was looking for…   “I never knew who to expect when I visited Daisy.  One time she would be staring out a window, alone in her thoughts, and completely incommunicado.  I would hold her hand and talk to her, hoping she could hear me.  Maybe she wouldn’t feel alone.  Curiously, the next visit would find her attired in one of her finest dresses bedecked in jewels and excited to see me.  She loved her diamonds, especially the bracelets, of which she had many.  She would chatter on, completely a different girl.  We would never bring up Long Island.  On occasion, she would ask me about her daughter, Pam.  Daisy had not been the most caring of mothers when well, and I wondered if she thought it odd that Pam never came to visit.  I would say she was just fine, and that was that.  Lakeview liked the guests, that’s what they called the patients, to dress as they had at home, and it could be quite the fashion show.  We would dine in the great room and the attendants always made quite a fuss over her.  Daisy liked that, as I think it brought back memories of the good times.  One day as I walked Daisy back to room 36, I asked her if she wasn’t the least bit concerned about the safety of her jewelry.  She assured me she wasn’t and was quite proud that she had been so clever.  Daisy explained that she had peeled back a square of wallpaper, and hollowed out a place in the wall.  With the wallpaper pushed back, “you couldn’t tell otherwise”, she said.  I didn’t ask her to show me, but she did say it was low to the ground.”

The demolition date was in two days, so with that bit of information and a few tools, I set off for the old hospital to see if I could get lucky.

Maybe now, I’ll get lucky with ‘Death in the Shadow of Saint Mary’s’.

Max Welton… Chicago… 1970

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Okay, I know what you are thinking… “The next F. Scott!” … please, I’m far to modest.  This is a post I started last June.  I had just seen ‘The Great Gatsby’, and was inspired to write a 100 Word Flash Fiction for Friday Fictioneers based on Daisy’s character.  It is actually Max’s story and can be seen here… Friday Fictioneers: LAST CHANCE  It got me to thinking about what life would have been like for Daisy after the book.  The only problem… I had never read The Great Gatsby, so I only had the movie to go on.  I know, I can hear it now… the outraged “Never read ‘The Great Gatsby’, The Great American Novel!!!… in your mind right now.  I’m still puzzled why it was never assigned to read in high school or college, but it was not, maybe it wasn’t The Great American Novel in the 1960’s.  So I had started the story of Max Welton and then put it on hold till I could read the book.  Mission accomplished, I finished my story and immediately got sidetracked with work, taking time off writing anything for a while.  And so my story languished in my draft file, a cold case, forgotten… until my memory was jolted by this line by Karen, in her blog Fat Girl In Boxing Gloves, ” They’re all in my draft box collecting cyberdust, and if that trollop of inspiration that stokes my creative fires ever returns, you’ll get to read them”.  My creative fires were re-lit and my story now sees the light of day, or the glow of your computer screen.  Please let me know what you think.

The photograph is of the Willard State Asylum in Upstate New York.  I came across it when looking for photos of gothic looking asylums to represent my made-up ‘Lakeview Sanitarium’.  I also came across an amazing story.  A project by photographer John Crispin, inspecting patients suitcases that had been stored in the Willard State Asylum, which closed in 1995 and had only recently been discovered.  It is pretty amazing… Willard Suitcases.

The Speakeasy #137 ~ COINS

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COINS

The lights dim and the white screen comes to life. You mute your cell and settle back with your bag of buttered popcorn. The only day of the year you go to the movies. It has become a tradition now. Oh, plenty of friends invite you over… some feel sorry, some want to fix you up with their girlfriends, and then there’s her folks. You politely decline.

“Don’t get me wrong, I don’t feel sorry for myself, I just like to be alone, and watch the latest holiday movie about fictional families doing what real families do, just maybe a little more outrageously. I’ll go home and have a turkey sandwich with cranberry sauce later, I picked one up at Katz’s Delicatessen yesterday.”

You had both been in a pretty bad place when you met. The church basement at Seventh and Pine was a comforting place, you started sitting together. You were told it wasn’t a good idea to form relationships within the group, you thought it was helping.

“I remember when I got my ninety day coin. She got her two month. We celebrated at Katz’s with coffee, pastrami sandwiches, and cheesecake. We kept collecting coins and fell in love.”

You watch the film and cringe when the drinking starts. You still don’t know what made her think she could have just one, and after three years sober. You never saw her again after that Thanksgiving. Everyone was at a loss. Occasionally you hear that someone has caught sight of her.

“Maybe I’ll go tonight. I go to my meetings at the YMCA now, I just couldn’t go back to 7th and Pine. From that day forward, every time I drove past that street corner, I thought of her.”

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THE SPEAKEASY… Check out the other writers… Write something yourself!

Here are the Editor’s instructions: This week our sentence prompt, provided by last week’s winner Courtney at IASoupMama, must be used as the LAST line in your piece. And in honour of the coming holiday, our media prompt this week is a video, which you will find below.  As with all our media prompts, your post shouldn’t be about the video, but you must make some sort of reference to it in your submission.

“From that day forward, every time I drove past that street corner, I thought of her.”

Trifextra: Week Eighty-Four… YOU HAVE TO BE READY…

YOU HAVE TO BE READY...

YOU HAVE TO BE READY… in 33 Words

His life had reached the end of its tether.
He decided it was time.
One final sip of Crown Royal,
Loft the bottle high into the air.
Watch it break.
Reclaim his life.

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Hopefully this is the first in a long string of stories.  It’s been a while.  This has been a busy Summer and I’ve missed writing and the blogging community of writers at Trifecta and Friday Fictioneers.

This is the instruction the Trifecta writers were given for this weeks Trifextra:

 “This weekend we’re asking for 30 of your own words plus the three following words for a total of 33 words.”  

                            Tether ~ Loft ~ Crown

To learn more about Trifecta and read the Trifextra stories, click on the Trike!

Friday Fictioneers… MUSE

It had been years since he touched a wheel.

Nothing said ‘vacation’ like daytime drinking, and he had been on vacation a long time.  No creative spark in sight.
It bothered him, and in clear moments would go to museums, hoping a muse would find him.

Now, kneading the clay, the familiar slap on the plaster bat bringing it all back, he couldn’t wait till the first kick.  He felt this might save him, for as in times almost forgot, he had no doubts it would be good.

Funny what pointed the way, another artist’s work,  a jeering face saying … “Loser.”

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Friday Fictioneers 100 Word Flash Fiction… This week’s photo prompt is by Joyce Johnson… Go see Rochelle… ADDICTED TO PURPLE … for info on how to join us.

To read other Fictioneers’ stories…

Friday Fictioneers… DISPLACED

It’s been three months now. The shakes have gotten worse. Chef dropped the plate off at the counter, and plodded back to the grill. 3 a.m., liver and onions, bacon and eggs, whores and drunks. Oh well, life at the Huddle House in Chicago.

Lit a cig and stirred the hash browns around. Needed a drink.

Have to remember to put cream down on the 86 board, so they order in the morning. At least he won’t be there listening to the customers bitch if they forget. At 3 a.m they don’t care about cream.

Big slide from the Palmer House.

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Friday Fictioneers 100Word Flash Fiction…  with the debut of new head honcho Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  Her photo prompt gave me this story from my Chicago days.  To read her story, and find out more about the Friday Fictioneers… CLICK HERE … Why don’t you join us with one of your stories?  We would love to have you.

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I closed my eyes and picked out a story from the past.  Maybe appropriate for the Moonshine Crowd.  We would go to this dive diner at 3am, after a night out at the bars in Chicago years ago.

HOW AMY WINEHOUSE SAVED TedBook!

I never make New Years Resolutions.  1 ~ Because if you want to do something… do it. I think resolutions are a crutch to procrastinate and make yourself feel better… and you will never keep them.  2 ~ Because I never kept them.  So this year, my New Year’s Resolution is to reopen TedBook and write something in it.  I feel better already.

My friend Margie told me, “only 8% were ever kept”.  I read that if you put it in writing, it may actually have a chance of happening.  Okay, it’s in writing now… it’s all up to me… I want to be in that 8%!   Yesterday I looked to see when the last entry in TedBook occurred… yikes!  January 2, 2011… one whole year of silence!  Another friend, Keri, reminded me of that this morning, after I mentioned I might start blogging again.

Why the silence?  No one particular reason really… I think mostly procrastination.  It’s not like I didn’t have any ideas… I had many, and wrote a lot of blogs in my mind, complete with photos.  But, I never got to the point of transferring them into my computer.  A lot of my friends asked me where TedBook was, and why they were not seeing new blogs.  I would hear… “where’s your blog”, “what happened to TedBook”, “weren’t you writing a blog”… after a while it was down to two.  O’B would bug me about it when we saw each other.  Louisa would mention it… in November, I got a note from her… “Why aren’t you writing?”  I could tell she was disappointed in me.  I thought… “I’m disappointed in me too”.  I have friends with blogs… Jane in L.A., a champion fighting Autism … Aggie in Chicago who posts a quiz everyday, except Saturday when she’s shacked up with her boyfriend.

The straw that broke the camel’s back, so to speak, was when O’B started a blog!  She had moved back to Sacramento, after an absence of some 30 years, and she and Anthony had bought a house in Southside Park.  Southside is a downtrodden mostly Latino neighborhood, that I have a feeling is becoming Yuppified (not naming any names here).  Catherine is a curious and outgoing woman, who has undertaken the chronicling of Southside.  Hence her blog

                      Southside Park: Forty-Six City Blocks of Surprise 

       Join me as I explore urban living in Sacramento’s Smallest Neighborhood.                                                                                 

Lord knows I waste enough time on facebook and playing Words with Friends (Alec Baldwin has yet to challenge me), so I really have the time… I just have to do it.  I was jealous with every new post O’B made… and she is prolific.  So, that’s what had been in the back of my mind, and I don’t mind admitting I was feeling guilty.  My own daughter, Ashley, was now more of a writer than me.  She had taken a creative writing class, and had written some impressive pieces.  I had encouraged her to start a blog… and I can’t even do my own… at least she has two teenagers to blame, or maybe just the college classes she is doing.  Sure better reasons than my slacking.  So, this was where I was at on New Year’s Eve.

I don’t drink Champagne or go to New Year’s Eve parties anymore.  The last one I went to, about 10 years ago, my date and I snuck out early and welcomed in the New Year in private… my best New Years Party ever.  This year I watched a movie, and was saying Happy New Year to my facebook friends when I saw this post.

I had been meaning to check out Amy’s latest album, ‘Lioness: Hidden Treasures’, and was glad for the reminder.  I’ve always liked Amy and was saddened  by her death and the loss of such a talent.  After listening to “Our Day Will Come” and “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow”, I was near tears.  Her day will never come, and there is no Tomorrow for Amy Winehouse.  It gave me pause to think… I was lucky, I had survived my drug of choice, which like her’s, was alcohol.  It’s destructive force had ruined relationships and created havoc in my life, but my biggest regret, is that I could have been and should have been a better father.  Unlike Amy, I was able to change my life for the better.  But, Amy made me face myself and make some choices that night.  One of those is to resume my blog.

                          Of course I bought the album and I reopened TedBook.

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This was an important post for me… another step in a bloggers life.  I thought I would share it with my friends at Yeah Write.

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